Persons on NC’s Death Row 2011

January 3, 2011

As of January 1, 2011, North Carolina’s death row was home to 159 men and women.

Date Received DOC # Last Name First Name Sex Race County of Conviction
8/21/85 0234897 Laws Wayne A. M W Davidson
11/5/90 0207779 Jennings Patricia W. F W Wilson
11/16/90 0288088 Moore Blanche T. F W Forsyth
11/22/91 0265106 McCollum Henry L. M B Cumberland
12/19/91 0351933 Rose Clinton R. M W Rockingham
3/12/92 0100579 Davis Edward E. M W Buncombe
3/25/92 0353186 Rouse Kenneth B. M B Randolph
5/14/92 0339314 Reeves Michael M. M W Craven
5/19/92 0347839 Robinson Eddie C. M B Bladen
9/23/92 0264009 McCarver Ernest P. M W Cabarrus
10/1/92 0294214 Moseley Carl M W Forsyth
2/5/93 0039561 Bowie Nathan M B Catawba
2/5/93 0039569 Bowie William M B Catawba
4/1/93 0057308 Burkes Rayford L. M B Iredell
4/21/93 0058316 Burr John M W Alamance
4/28/93 0104984 Decastro Eugene M B Johnston
5/18/93 0156518 Gregory Warren M B Pitt
5/27/93 0251740 Lynch David M W Gaston
6/1/93 0021418 Barrett Jeffrey M B Northampton
6/7/93 0030124 Best Norfolk M B Columbus
7/8/93 0063592 Campbell James M W Rowan
9/3/93 0141374 Garner Daniel M W Robeson
10/4/93 0099090 Daughtry Johnny R. M W Johnston
10/8/93 0054499 Buckner George C. M W Gaston
11/3/93 0441726 Williams James E. M W Randolph
11/22/93 0343075 Richardson Martin A. M B Union
12/8/93 0012311 Atkins Randy L. M W Buncombe
2/3/94 0017060 Ball Terry L. M W Beaufort
3/10/94 0071799 Chambers Frank J. M B Rowan
3/10/94 0020590 Barnes William L. M B Rowan
4/20/94 0221506 Kandies Jeffrey M W Randolph
4/29/94 0453231 Wooten Vincent M. M B Pitt
5/4/94 0120038 Elliott John R. M W Davidson
6/14/94 0082151 Cole Wade L. M B Camden
8/5/94 0348505 Robinson Marcus M B Cumberland
8/12/94 0166056 Harden Alden M B Mecklenburg
9/15/94 0438643 Wilkinson Phillip M W Cumberland
9/29/94 0143501 Geddie Malcolm M B Johnston
12/16/94 0095279 Cummings Daniel M I Brunswick
1/25/95 0443375 Williams Marvin E. M B Wayne
4/30/91 0085045 Connor Jerry W. M W Gates
2/9/95 0478925 Stroud Isaac J. M B Durham
2/24/95 0404386 Thomas James E. M B Wake
3/15/95 0368820 Sidden Tony M. M W Alexander
3/24/95 0036850 Bond Charles P. M B Bertie
4/28/95 0233526 Larry Thomas M. M B Forsyth
5/22/95 0497100 Woods Darrell C. M B Forsyth
6/1/95 0492102 Richardson Timothy M B Nash
6/16/95 0061528 Cagle Richard M W Cumberland
7/22/95 0180479 Herring William M B Wake
10/6/95 0487180 Warren Leslie M W Buncombe
10/27/95 0393145 Strickland Darrell M I Union
10/31/95 0511057 Hill Jerry Dale M W Harnett
11/8/95 0511998 East Keith B. M B Surry
11/10/95 0275678 McNeil John D. M B Cumberland
11/14/95 0414853 Tyler Stacey A. M B Hertford
12/20/95 0388922 Stephens Davy G. M W Johnston
2/21/96 0413011 Tucker Russell M B Forsyth
2/26/96 0495163 Neal Kenneth M B Rockingham
4/18/96 0499258 Murillo Eric F. M W Richmond
4/26/96 0238344 LeGrande Guy T. M B Stanly
5/10/96 0376917 Smith Jamie L. M B Buncombe
5/14/96 0246186 Locklear Robbie D. M I Robeson
6/5/96 0471315 Billings Archie L. M W Caswell
6/20/96 0506556 Guevara Angel M O Johnston
7/23/96 0440399 Williams David K. M B Bertie
8/9/96 0405380 Thomas Walic C. M B Guilford
9/27/96 0037215 Bonnett Shawn D. M B Martin
10/2/96 0510234 Davis James F. M W Buncombe
10/15/96 0434355 White Melvin L. M B Craven
8/15/94 0156529 Gregory William M B Davie
11/19/96 0412440 Trull Gary A. M W Randolph
12/12/96 0320825 Peterson Lawrence M B Richmond
1/29/97 0422350 Wallace Henry L. M B Mecklenburg
2/18/97 0539901 Taylor Terrence M B Lenoir
3/24/97 0311966 Parker Johnny S. M W Sampson
4/8/97 0571536 Fleming John H. M B Northampton
7/3/97 0176701 Hedgepeth Rowland M W Halifax
7/15/97 0255136 Mann Leroy M B Wake
8/22/97 0585797 Davis Phillip M B Buncombe
8/29/97 0352024 Roseboro Christopher M B Gaston
9/10/97 0033802 Blakeney Roger M B Union
11/4/97 0488288 Mitchell Marcos M B Wake
11/11/97 0095361 Cummings Jerry M I Robeson
11/14/97 0134151 Fowler Elrico M B Mecklenburg
11/18/97 0552017 Moses Errol M B Forsyth
11/21/97 0043529 Braxton Michael M B Halifax
12/11/97 0597164 Lawrence Jimmie M B Harnett
3/5/98 0599379 Williams John M B Wake
3/27/98 0137368 Frogge Danny M W Forsyth
4/7/98 0587681 Holman Allen M W Wake
4/24/98 0158506 Grooms Timmy M W Scotland
5/13/98 0590940 Golphin Tilmon M B Cumberland
7/23/98 0542024 Hyde Johnny M I Onslow
8/28/98 0388640 Steen Patrick M W Mecklenburg
9/3/98 0584095 Brewington Robert M I Harnett
10/23/98 0472274 Taylor Rodney M B New Hanover
11/23/98 0226428 King James M B Guilford
2/4/99 0280127 Meyer Jeffery M W Cumberland
2/22/99 0330166 Prevatte Ted M W Stanly
3/2/99 0515143 Thibodeaux Raymond M W Forsyth
3/18/99 0580028 May Lyle M W Buncombe
4/1/99 0311386 Parker Carlette F B Wake
5/18/99 0125241 Fair Nathaniel M B Wake
5/22/99 0542384 Call Eric M W Ashe
5/27/99 0654009 Wiley Keith M B New Hanover
6/3/99 0654093 Anthony William M W Gaston
6/4/99 0206197 Jaynes James M W Polk
7/8/99 0291861 Morgan James M B Buncombe
10/26/99 0007328 Anderson Billy M B Craven
11/12/99 0491889 Barden Iziah M B Sampson
12/09/99 0130628 Fletcher Andre L. M B Rutherford
02/07/00 0199877 Hyatt Terry A. M W Buncombe
02/09/00 0561692 Hooks Cerron T. M B Forsyth
04/10/00 0349019 Robinson Terry L. M B Wilson
05/17/00 0688223 Squires Mark L. M B Pitt
07/06/00 0626944 Walters Christina F I Cumberland
08/11/00 0051026 Brown Paul A. M B Wayne
08/31/00 0434845 White Timothy L. M W Forsyth
09/08/00 0189289 Holmes Michael D. M B Johnston
11/9/00 0217326 Jones, Sr. M. Douglas M W Onslow
3/19/01 0486636 Carter Shan E. M B New Hanover
4/19/01 0702066 Garcia Fernando M O Wake
6/6/01 0561943 Haselden Jim E. M W Stokes
7/19/01 0428143 Watts James M W Davidson
8/24/01 0592464 Bell Bryan C. M B Onslow
10/25/01 0742512 Miller Clifford Ray M O Onslow
3/14/02 0379083 Smith Reche M B Washington
3/28/02 0064125 Campbell Terrance M B Pender
5/29/02 0765397 Smith Wesley M W Rowan
10/23/02 0612123 Augustine Quintel M B Brunswick
11/14/02 0406487 Thompson John Henry M B Guilford
6/14/03 0290634 Al-Bayyinah Jathiyah M B Davie
9/26/03 0113234 Duke Jeffrey Neal M W Gaston
10/8/03 0133102 Forte Linwood M B Wayne
11/18/03 0005091 Allen Scott D. M W Montgomery
12/18/03 0120236 Elliott Terrance R. M B Moore
3/17/04 0509565 Hurst Jason M W Randolph
5/6/04 0014016 Badgett John Scott M W Randolph
9/8/04 0523493 Cummings Paul M B New Hanover
2/7/05 0801680 Polke Alexander M I Randolph
2/8/05 0150949 Goss Christopher M W Ashe
7/11/05 0667195 Lane Eric Glenn M W Wayne
8/24/2005 0762634 Taylor Eddie M B Harnett
9/9/2005 0526698 Raines William H. M W Henderson
2/17/2006 0940436 Murrell Jeremy M B Forsyth
4/4/2006 0831753 Maness Darrell W. M W Brunswick
4/4/2006 0775602 Garcell Ryan G. M O Rutherford
12/20/2006 0900281 Wilkerson George M W Randolph
5/1/2007 0441044 Williams Eugene M B Cumberland
7/2/2007 1025501 Waring Byron M B Wake
10/17/2007 0604251 Phillips Mario M B Moore
11/21/2008 0846840 Little James R. M B Forsyth
2/23/2009 0366770 Sherrill Michael M W Mecklenburg
4/9/2009 0796623 Bacote Jamaal H. M B Johnston
5/23/2010 1033115 Ryan Michael M W Gaston
6/8/2010 0972488 Ramseur Andrew M B Iredell
11/8/2010 1062462 Buckner Stephen M W McDowell
11/19/2010 0172431 Hartford Timothy, Jr. M W Forsyth

NC Death Penalty – 2010 Year in Review

December 30, 2010

Quick Facts

  • Executions: 0
  • Persons removed from death row for other reasons: 3
  • New death sentences: 4
  • Capital trials not resulting in death: 9

In Detail

> Persons Removed from Death Row

  • Jamey Cheek (New Hanover) – Cheek was re-sentenced to life for a 1996 killing after the court found that the prosecution intentionally withheld evidence favorable to the defense at trial.  This evidence was relevant to whether Cheek was present at the time of the murder.  (Cheek participated in the kidnapping that led up to the killing, which could make him guilty under the felony murder theory.  However, the fact that he was not present during the actual killing would likely have made a difference to the jury for sentencing purposes.)  You can read the court’s order here.
  • Abner Nicholson (Wilson) – Nicholson’s death sentence was converted to life after a court determined that he is mentally retarded.  Nicholson was convicted in 1999 of shooting his wife and the local police chief.  You can read the court’s order granting relief here.
  • Kyle Berry (New Hanover) – Berry was re-sentenced to life after it was determined that the trial court committed error in refusing to allow his lawyers adequate time to investigate and present evidence of pervasive mental illness in Mr. Berry’s family.  Because the jury did not know the true extent of Mr. Berry’s genetically based mental illness, they did not have all of the information they needed to accurately determine an appropriate sentence for his crime.  The court’s order is here.

> Persons Sentenced to Death at Trial

  • Michael Ryan (Gaston) – Fired his attorneys and asked the jury to sentence him to death.  Ryan was convicted based largely on the testimony of a co-defendant who received a lesser sentence in exchange for his cooperation.  The first jury to hear the case deadlocked on the question of guilt; this was Ryan’s second trial.
  • Andrew Ramseur (Iredell) – Black defendant sentenced to death by an all-white jury.  Ramseur killed two people during a botched store robbery.  His ability to plan and control his actions was reduced by the combination of a head injury and the unknowing ingestion of a hallucinogenic drug.
  • Stephen Buckner (McDowell) – Buckner was sentenced to death for a domestic triple murder.  He is deeply remorseful for his actions.
  • Timothy Hartford (Forsyth) – Hartford received one death sentence and one life sentence for a double homicide.  Hartford is severely mentally ill, suffering from both bipolar disorder and PTSD.  He was also addicted to drugs at the time of the crime.  His co-defendant was allowed to plead guilty and avoid the death penalty.

> Persons Given Other Sentences at Trial

  • Abdullah Shareef (Cumberland) – jury voted unanimously for life.  Shareef is a paranoid schizophrenic and was held in a mental institution for six years before becoming competent enough to stand trial.  He was convicted of stealing a city van and running down five people, killing one.
  • Samuel Cooper (Wake) – jury voted unanimously for life.  Cooper was convicted of killing five people in separate incidents spanning two years.  The jury found that Cooper was mentally damaged as the result of a childhood fraught with extreme abuse.
  • Alfred Willard (Mitchell) – pleaded guilty to second degree murder during trial.  Willard killed his live-in girlfriend and tried to conceal her body.
  • Carlos Keels (Robeson) – jury voted unanimously for life.  Keels beat his girlfriend’s daughter to death.
  • Demeatrius Montgomery (Mecklenburg) – court declared case non-capital after investigating officer was found to have destroyed evidence.  Montgomery was accused of killing two Charlotte police officers who were responding to an unrelated call.
  • Travis Ramseur (Iredell) – jury voted unanimously for life.  Ramseur was convicted of killing two men and wounding a third.
  • Dexter McRae (Cumberland) – jury voted unanimously for life.  McRae was convicted of raping and murdering his estranged wife, stabbing her more than 50 times.
  • Edwardo Wong (Catawba) – sentenced to life after jury could not reach unanimous decision.  Wong was convicted of killing a state trooper during a traffic stop.
  • Albert Ramos (Scotland) – pleaded guilty and accepted life sentence during trial.  Ramos killed his mother and stepfather, then fled the state.

Other Significant Events

  • Demario Atwater (FED) – In a North Carolina federal court, Atwater received a life sentence for the highly publicized killing of the UNC student body president.
  • Alejandro Umana (FED) – Also in an NC federal court, Umana was sentenced to death for a gang-related double murder.
  • Timothy Hennis (MIL) – In military court, Hennis was sentenced to death for the same crime for which he was twice tried (once sentenced to death and once acquitted) in civilian court.
  • Racial Justice Act – Following last year’s passage of the RJA, pre-trial defendants and death row inmates have filed claims under the law alleging that their death sentences were sought or obtained on the basis of race.  It remains to be seen how the law will ultimately be interpreted by the courts.
  • State Bureau of Investigation – A blockbuster investigation by Raleigh’s News and Observer revealed widespread and systemic misconduct at the state agency charged with conducting investigations and forensic testing in criminal cases.  A report commissioned by the Attorney General’s Office identified 269 defendants whose cases were affected by faulty evidence.  (The report looked at one test done by one division of the SBI lab; it found an error rate of nearly 25%.)

Study: DAs Drive Up NC Death Penalty Costs

January 12, 2009

Indigent Defense Services, which oversees legal representation for all indigent defendants in North Carolina, has released a study about the cost of the death penalty at the trial level.  The study is available online here.

The primary revelation of the study is that the cost of the death penalty has been exploded by DA charging decisions.

A person accused of intentional homicide can be charged with first degree murder, second degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, depending on the circumstances of the killing.  As many as 88% of intentional homicides are charged as either first degree or undesignated murder.  These cases cost, on average, $27,834 in defense spending.  [The State does not release data on the cost of prosecuting such cases.]  However, 83% of these cases are resolved with pleas or verdicts of second degree murder or less.  Had they been charged as second degree murder from the beginning, each case would have cost approximately $1,931.  When you consider that there are on average 869 intentional homicides in North Carolina every year, better charging decisions could save just shy of $20 million annually.

Another way DAs drive up costs is by proceeding capitally in roughly a third of all first degree murder cases.  The death penalty is supposed to be reserved for the rare, egregious case.  By seeking death in a first degree murder case, DAs magnify defense costs – tripling costs in cases that end in a plea, quintupling costs in cases that go to trial.  Between 2002 and 2005, DAs sought death at some point in 464 cases.  Had all of those cases proceeded non-capitally, the state of North Carolina would have saved over $21 million.

Remember that since 2001, the State has only obtained a death sentence in 3% of cases where it has been sought.  More than 60% of cases in which the State initially sought the death penalty resulted in a conviction of second degree murder or less.

A few other findings:

  • The average cost of a potentially capital case has not risen in the last several years.  However, the number of open cases has grown significantly, increasing costs overall.
  • While the media tends to focus on expensive, high-profile cases, half of potentially capital cases are resolved for less than $15,000 in defense expenditures (attorney and expert costs combined).

The study does not propose that the death penalty be abolished to save money.  It simply suggests that IDS and district attorneys can work together to reduce the waste produced by reckless charging decisions.  In these tough economic times, that’s not politics, that’s just good sense.


Persons on North Carolina’s Death Row 2009

January 2, 2009

DOC #

Last Name

First Name

County

1

0234897

Laws

Wayne A.

Davidson

2

0207779

Jennings

Patricia W.

Wilson

3

0288088

Moore

Blanche T.

Forsyth

4

0265106

McCollum

Henry L.

Cumberland

5

0351933

Rose

Clinton R.

Rockingham

6

0100579

Davis

Edward E.

Buncombe

7

0353186

Rouse

Kenneth B.

Randolph

8

0339314

Reeves

Michael M.

Craven

9

0347839

Robinson

Eddie C.

Bladen

10

0264009

McCarver

Ernest P.

Cabarrus

11

0294214

Moseley

Carl

Forsyth

12

0039561

Bowie

Nathan

Catawba

13

0039569

Bowie

William

Catawba

14

0057308

Burkes

Rayford L.

Iredell

15

0058316

Burr

John

Alamance

16

0104984

Decastro

Eugene

Johnston

17

0156518

Gregory

Warren

Pitt

18

0251740

Lynch

David

Gaston

19

0021418

Barrett

Jeffrey

Northampton

20

0030124

Best

Norfolk

Columbus

21

0063592

Campbell

James

Rowan

22

0141374

Garner

Daniel

Robeson

23

0099090

Daughtry

Johnny R.

Johnston

24

0054499

Buckner

George C.

Gaston

25

0441726

Williams

James E.

Randolph

26

0149506

Goode

George E.

Harnett

27

0343075

Richardson

Martin A.

Union

28

0012311

Atkins

Randy L.

Buncombe

29

0153856

Gray

William

Lenoir

30

0017060

Ball

Terry L.

Beaufort

31

0071799

Chambers

Frank J.

Rowan

32

0020590

Barnes

William L.

Rowan

33

0221506

Kandies

Jeffrey

Randolph

34

0453231

Wooten

Vincent M.

Pitt

35

0120038

Elliott

John R.

Davidson

36

0082151

Cole

Wade L.

Camden

37

0348505

Robinson

Marcus

Cumberland

38

0166056

Harden

Alden

Mecklenburg

39

0438643

Wilkinson

Phillip

Cumberland

40

0143501

Geddie

Malcolm

Johnston

41

0095279

Cummings

Daniel

Brunswick

42

0443375

Williams

Marvin E.

Wayne

43

0085045

Connor

Jerry W.

Gates

44

0478925

Stroud

Isaac J.

Durham

45

0404386

Thomas

James E.

Wake

46

0368820

Sidden

Tony M.

Alexander

47

0036850

Bond

Charles P.

Bertie

48

0233526

Larry

Thomas M.

Forsyth

49

0497100

Woods

Darrell C.

Forsyth

50

0492102

Richardson

Timothy

Nash

51

0061528

Cagle

Richard

Cumberland

52

0180479

Herring

William

Wake

53

0487180

Warren

Leslie

Buncombe

54

0393145

Strickland

Darrell

Union

55

0511057

Hill

Jerry Dale

Harnett

56

0511998

East

Keith B.

Surry

57

0275678

McNeil

John D.

Cumberland

58

0414853

Tyler

Stacey A.

Hertford

59

0388922

Stephens

Davy G.

Johnston

60

0413011

Tucker

Russell

Forsyth

61

0495163

Neal

Kenneth

Rockingham

62

0528622

McNeill

Elmer R.

Wake

63

0499258

Murillo

Eric F.

Richmond

64

0238344

LeGrande

Guy T.

Stanly

65

0376917

Smith

Jamie L.

Buncombe

66

0246186

Locklear

Robbie D.

Robeson

67

0471315

Billings

Archie L.

Caswell

68

0506556

Guevara

Angel

Johnston

69

0440399

Williams

David K.

Bertie

70

0405380

Thomas

Walic C.

Guilford

71

0037215

Bonnett

Shawn D.

Martin

72

0510234

Davis

James F.

Buncombe

73

0434355

White

Melvin L.

Craven

74

0156529

Gregory

William

Davie

75

0412440

Trull

Gary A.

Randolph

76

0320825

Peterson

Lawrence E.

Richmond

77

0422350

Wallace

Henry L.

Mecklenburg

78

0539901

Taylor

Terrence

Lenoir

79

0311966

Parker

Johnny S.

Sampson

80

0571536

Fleming

John H.

Northampton

81

0176701

Hedgepath

Rowland

Halifax

82

0538027

Cheek

Jamey

New Hanover

83

0255136

Mann

Leroy

Wake

84

0585797

Davis

Phillip

Buncombe

85

0352024

Roseboro

Christopher

Gaston

86

0033802

Blakeney

Roger

Union

87

0488288

Mitchell

Marcus

Wake

88

0095361

Cummings

Jerry

Robeson

89

0134151

Fowler

Elrico

Mecklenburg

90

0552017

Moses

Erroll

Forsyth

91

0043529

Braxton

Michael

Halifax

92

0597164

Lawrence

Jimmie

Harnett

93

0599379

Williams

John

Wake

94

0137368

Frogg

Danny

Forsyth

95

0587681

Holman

Allen

Wake

96

0158506

Grooms

Timmy

Scotland

97

0590940

Golphin

Tilmon

Cumberland

98

0542024

Hyde

Johnny

Onslow

99

0388640

Steen

Patrick

Mecklenburg

100

0584095

Brewington

Robert

Harnett

101

0472274

Taylor

Rodney

New Hanover

102

0226428

King

James

Guilford

103

0280127

Meyer

Jeffery

Cumberland

104

0330166

Prevatte

Ted

Stanly

105

0515143

Thibodeaux

Raymond

Forsyth

106

0580028

May

Lyle

Buncombe

107

0311386

Parker

Carlette

Wake

108

0125241

Fair

Nathaniel

Wake

109

0542384

Call

Eric

Ashe

110

0654009

Wiley

Keith

New Hanover

111

0654093

Anthony

William

Gaston

112

0206197

Jaynes

James

Polk

113

0291861

Morgan

James

Buncombe

114

0139378

Gainey

David

Harnett

115

0007328

Anderson

Billy

Craven

116

0491889

Barden

Iziah

Sampson

117

0670167

Nicholson

Abner

Wilson

118

0130628

Fletcher

Andre L.

Rutherford

119

0199877

Hyatt

Terry A.

Buncombe

120

0561692

Hooks

Cerron T.

Forsyth

121

0349019

Robinson

Terry L.

Wilson

122

0688223

Squires

Mark L.

Pitt

123

0626944

Walters

Christina

Cumberland

124

0051026

Brown

Paul A.

Wayne

125

0434845

White

Timothy L.

Forsyth

126

0189289

Holmes

Michael D.

Johnston

127

0217326

Jones, Sr.

Marcus D.

Onslow

128

0486636

Carter

Shan E.

New Hanover

129

0702066

Garcia

Fernando L.

Wake

130

0561943

Haselden

Jim E.

Stokes

131

0428143

Watts

James Hollis

Davidson

132

0592464

Bell

Bryan

Onslow

133

0742512

Miller

Clifford Ray

Onslow

134

0379083

Smith

Reche

Washington

135

0064125

Campbell

Terrance

Pender

136

0765397

Smith

Wesley Toby

Rowan

137

0612123

Augustine

Quintel

Brunswick

138

0406487

Thompson

John Henry

Guilford

139

0290634

Moore
(Al-Bayyinah)

Terry
(Jathiyah)

Davie

140

0507467

McNeill

Jimmy

Scotland

141

0113234

Duke

Jeffrey Neal

Gaston

142

0133102

Forte

Linwood Earl

Wayne

143

0005091

Allen

Scott D.

Montgomery

144

0120236

Elliott

Terrance R.

Moore

145

0562597

Berry

Kyle O.

New Hanover

146

0509565

Hurst

Jason Wayne

Randolph

147

0014016

Badgett

John Scott

Randolph

148

0523493

Cummings

Paul Dewayne

New Hanover

149

0801680

Polke

Alexander C.

Randolph

150

0150949

Goss

Christopher

Ashe

151

0245105

Locklear

Dane Jr.

Robeson

152

0667195

Lane

Eric Glenn

Wayne

153

0762634

Taylor

Eddie Larmar

Harnett

154

0526698

Raines

William H.

Henderson

155

0940436

Murrell

Jeremy

Forsyth

156

0831753

Maness

Darrell W.

Brunswick

157

0775602

Garcell

Ryan G.

Rutherford

158

0900281

Wilkerson

George

Randolph

159

0441044

Williams

Eugene

Cumberland

160

1025501

Waring

Byron Lamar

Wake

161

0604251

Phillips

Mario

Moore

162

0846840

Little

James R.

Forsyth

(Adapted from here)


NC Death Penalty Year in Review 2008

December 18, 2008

It has been an exceptional year for life in North Carolina.  No one was executed, and only one new person was added to death row (the lowest number since the reinstatement of the death penalty in 1977).  This year, as many capital defendants were acquitted as were sentenced to death.  More death row inmates were exonerated than executed.  North Carolina should be proud.

Nationally, executions began again following the Supreme Court’s decision in Baze v. Rees, but lethal injection remains stalled in North Carolina due to litigation by inmates subject to the procedure as well as the doctors forced to participate in it.

Capital Trial Statistics

Life without parole – 9 (Kenneth Hartley, Charles Dickerson, Eric Oakes, Jakiem Wilson, James Stitt, Robert Windsor, Lisa Greene, Neil Sargeant, James Blue)

Sentences less than life -3 (Pliney Purser, Jonte McLaurin, John Chavis Ross)

Death -1 (James Ray Little)

Military capital trial acquittals – 1 (Alberto Martinez)

Post-Conviction Statistics

Executions – 0

Exonerations – 2 (Levon “Bo” Jones, Glen Edward Chapman)

Death row inmates getting new trials – 2 (John Conaway, William Moore)

Death row inmates getting new sentencing hearings – 1 (William Gray)

Otherwise removed from death row – 2 (Clinton Smith, Carlos Cannady)

Incompetent for execution – 1 (Guy LeGrande)

Deaths from natural causes – 3 (Gary Greene, Leroy McNeill, George Page)

If you would like to be part of making 2009 another Year of Life, please consider making a donation to NC-based groups like the Fair Trial Initiative.


2008 North Carolina Death Row Quick Facts

December 15, 2008

Total number of people executed since 1977: 43

Innocent persons freed from death row: 8

Clemencies granted: 5

Current death row population: 162

Method of execution: lethal injection

Race and gender

  • Black men: 86
  • White men: 60
  • Native American men: 8
  • Other men: 4
  • White women: 2
  • Black women: 1
  • Native American women: 1

County of conviction

  • Alamance: 1
  • Alexander: 1
  • Ashe: 2
  • Beaufort: 1
  • Bertie: 2
  • Bladen: 1
  • Brunswick: 3
  • Buncombe: 9
  • Cabarrus: 1
  • Camden: 1
  • Caswell: 1
  • Catawba: 2
  • Columbus: 1
  • Craven: 3
  • Cumberland: 9
  • Davidson: 3
  • Davie: 2
  • Durham: 1
  • Forsyth: 12
  • Gaston: 5
  • Gates: 1
  • Guilford: 3
  • Halifax: 2
  • Harnett: 6
  • Henderson: 1
  • Hertford: 1
  • Iredell: 1
  • Johnston: 6
  • Lenoir: 2
  • Martin: 1
  • Mecklenburg: 4
  • Montgomery: 1
  • Moore: 2
  • Nash: 1
  • New Hanover: 6
  • Northampton: 2
  • Onslow: 4
  • Pender: 1
  • Pitt: 3
  • Polk: 1
  • Randolph: 8
  • Richmond: 2
  • Robeson: 4
  • Rockingham: 2
  • Rowan: 4
  • Rutherford: 2
  • Sampson: 2
  • Scotland: 2
  • Stanly: 2
  • Stokes: 1
  • Surry: 1
  • Union: 3
  • Wake: 11
  • Washington: 1
  • Wayne: 4
  • Wilson: 3

Counties with no death sentences: 43

(Alleghany, Anson, Avery, Burke, Caldwell, Carteret, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Clay, Cleveland, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Edgecombe, Franklin, Graham, Granville, Greene, Haywood, Hoke, Hyde, Jackson, Jones, Lee, Lincoln, McDowell, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, Orange, Pamlico, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Person, Swain, Transylvania, Tyrrell, Vance, Warren, Wilkes, Yadkin, Yancey)


People on North Carolina’s Death Row

September 4, 2007
DOC # Last Name First Name Sex Race
1 0234897 Laws Wayne A. M W
2 0207779 Jennings Patricia W. F W
3 0288088 Moore Blanche T. F W
4 0265106 McCollum Henry L. M B
5 0351933 Rose Clinton R. M W
6 0100579 Davis Edward E. M W
7 0353186 Rouse Kenneth B. M B
8 0339314 Reeves Michael M. M W
9 0347839 Robinson Eddie C. M B
10 0264009 McCarver Ernest P. M W
11 0294214 Moseley Carl M W
12 0084604 Conaway John L. M B
13 0039561 Bowie Nathan M B
14 0039569 Bowie William M B
15 0057308 Burkes Rayford L. M B
16 0058316 Burr John M W
17 0104984 Decastro Eugene M B
18 0156518 Gregory Warren M B
19 0251740 Lynch David M W
20 0021418 Barrett Jeffrey M B
21 0030124 Best Norfolk M B
22 0063592 Campbell James M W
23 0141374 Garner Daniel M W
24 0099090 Daughtry Johnny R. M W
25 0054499 Buckner George C. M W
26 0441726 Williams James E. M W
27 0149506 Goode George E. M B
28 0343075 Richardson Martin A. M B
29 0012311 Atkins Randy L. M W
30 0153856 Gray William M W
31 0017060 Ball Terry L. M W
32 0071799 Chambers Frank J. M B
33 0020590 Barnes William L. M B
34 0221506 Kandies Jeffrey M W
35 0453231 Wooten Vincent M. M B
36 0120038 Elliott John R. M W
37 0082151 Cole Wade L. M B
38 0348505 Robinson Marcus M B
39 0166056 Harden Alden M B
40 0438643 Wilkinson Phillip M W
41 0143501 Geddie Malcolm M B
42 0072845 Chapman Glenn E. M B
43 0095279 Cummings Daniel M I
44 0443375 Williams Marvin E. M B
45 0085045 Connor Jerry W. M W
46 0478925 Stroud Isaac J. M B
47 0404386 Thomas James E. M B
48 0368820 Sidden Tony M. M W
49 0036850 Bond Charles P. M B
50 0233526 Larry Thomas M. M B
51 0497100 Woods Darrell C. M B
52 0492102 Richardson Timothy M B
53 0061528 Cagle Richard M W
54 0180479 Herring William M B
55 0487180 Warren Leslie M W
56 0393145 Strickland Darrell M I
57 0511057 Hill Jerry Dale M W
58 0511998 East Keith B. M B
59 0275678 McNeil John D. M B
60 0414853 Tyler Stacey A. M B
61 0388922 Stephens Davy G. M W
62 0413011 Tucker Russell M B
63 0495163 Neal Kenneth M B
64 0528622 McNeill Elmer R. M W
65 0499258 Murillo Eric F. M W
66 0310202 Page George F. M W
67 0238344 LeGrande Guy T. M B
68 0376917 Smith Jamie L. M B
69 0246186 Locklear Robbie D. M I
70 0471315 Billings Archie L. M W
71 0506556 Guevara Angel M O
72 0440399 Williams David K. M B
73 0405380 Thomas Walic C. M B
74 0037215 Bonnett Shawn D. M B
75 0510234 Davis James F. M W
76 0434355 White Melvin L. M B
77 0156529 Gregory William M B
78 0275780 McNeil LeRoy M B
79 0412440 Trull Gary A. M W
80 0320825 Peterson Lawrence E. M B
81 0422350 Wallace Henry L. M B
82 0539901 Taylor Terrence M B
83 0311966 Parker Johnny S. M W
84 0571536 Fleming John H. M B
85 0176701 Hedgepath Rowland M W
86 0538027 Cheek Jamey M W
87 0255136 Mann Leroy M B
88 0585797 Davis Phillip M B
89 0352024 Roseboro Christopher M B
90 0033802 Blakeney Roger M B
91 0488288 Mitchell Marcos M B
92 0095361 Cummings Jerry M I
93 0134151 Fowler Elrico M B
94 0552017 Moses Erroll M B
95 0043529 Braxton Michael M B
96 0599379 Williams John M B
97 0137368 Frogg Danny M W
98 0587681 Holman Allen M W
99 0507433 Smith Clinton M B
100 0158506 Grooms Timmy M W
101 0590940 Golphin Tilmon M B
102 0155512 Greene Gary M W
103 0542024 Hyde Johnny M I
104 0388640 Steen Patrick M W
105 0584095 Brewington Robert M I
106 0472274 Taylor Rodney M B
107 0226428 King James M B
108 0280127 Meyer Jeffery M W
109 0330166 Prevatte Ted M W
110 0515143 Thibodeaux Raymond M W
111 0580028 May Lyle M W
112 0311386 Parker Carlette F B
113 0125241 Fair Nathaniel M B
114 0542384 Call Eric M W
115 0654009 Wiley Keith M B
116 0654093 Anthony William M W
117 0206197 Jaynes James M W
118 0291861 Morgan James M B
119 0139378 Gainey David M B
120 0007328 Anderson Billy M B
121 0491889 Barden Iziah M B
122 0670167 Nicholson Abner M B
123 0130628 Fletcher Andre L. M B
124 0199877 Hyatt Terry A. M W
125 0561692 Hooks Cerron T. M B
126 0349019 Robinson Terry L. M B
127 0688223 Squires Mark L. M B
128 0626944 Walters Christina F I
129 0051026 Brown Paul A. M B
130 0434845 White Timothy L. M W
131 0189289 Holmes Michael D. M B
132 0217326 Jones, Sr. Marcus Douglas M W
133 0486636 Carter Shan E. M B
134 0702066 Garcia Fernando L. M O
135 0561943 Haselden Jim E. M W
136 0428143 Watts James Hollis M W
137 0592464 Bell Bryan Christopher M B
138 0742512 Miller Clifford Ray M O
139 0379083 Smith Reche M B
140 0064125 Campbell Terrance M B
141 0765397 Smith Wesley Toby M W
142 0612123 Augustine Quintel M B
143 0406487 Thompson John Henry M B
144 0290634 Moore
(Al-Bayyinah)
Terry
(Jathiyah)
M B
145 0507467 McNeill Jimmy M B
146 0113234 Duke Jeffrey Neal M W
147 0133102 Forte Linwood Earl M B
148 0005091 Allen Scott D. M W
149 0120236 Elliott Terrance R. M B
150 0562597 Berry Kyle O. M W
151 0509565 Hurst Jason Wayne M W
152 0014016 Badgett John Scott M W
153 0523493 Cummings Paul Dewayne M B
154 0801680 Polke Alexander C. M I
155 0150949 Goss Christopher M W
156 0245105 Locklear Dane Jr. M I
157 0667195 Lane Eric Glenn M W
158 0762634 Taylor Eddie Larmar M B
159 0526698 Raines William H. M W
160 0940436 Murrell Jeremy Dushane M B
161 0831753 Maness Darrell W. M W
162 0775602 Garcell Ryan G. M O
163 0290914 Moore William Joseph M W
164 0900281 Wilkerson George Thomas M W
165 0441044 Williams Eugene Johnny M B
166 T368849 Waring Byron Lamar M B

A Brief History of Capital Punishment in North Carolina

August 29, 2007

Early America

Colonists brought the practice of capital punishment with them from England. Many of the crimes that had been death-eligible in England – robbery, burglary, arson, counterfeiting, theft, and of course murder – were quickly made capital in the common law. The colonies also executed people for other crimes, including witchcraft, aiding a runaway slave, forgery, and concealing a birth. At this time, there were no prisons, only small local jails incapable of containing criminals for long periods of time. Death was one of few punishments available in the event of a serious crime.

hanging of Wilfred RoseboroThe first known execution in the colonies was that of George Kendall, who was shot to death in Virginia in 1608 for espionage. Most early executions were carried out by hanging, but such methods as breaking on a wheel, hanging in chains, gibbeting, bludgeoning, and burning at the stake were also employed. The first person executed in North Carolina was likely George Senneca, hung on August 26, 1726 for murder. Four hundred and twenty-two others lost their lives in a similar fashion over the next 184 years.

(This figure includes only state-sanctioned killings, not lynchings or other extrajudicial punishments. The image above, taken from the Department of Corrections website, shows the hanging of Wilfred Roseboro in Iredell County in 1903.)

The Early 1900s

The State took over the administration of the death penalty in 1910. For the first time, executions were conducted indoors and away from public view. An electric chair was installed in Central Prison, which had been completed in 1884. chair from NC gas chamberThe first person to die in the chair was Walter Morrison of Robeson County, who was electrocuted on March 18, 1910 for the crime of rape. The last person to die in the chair was Wiley Brice of Alamance County, electrocuted on July 1, 1938 for murder.

In 1936, North Carolina installed a gas chamber at Central Prison. Allen Foster of Hoke County was the first to die in this manner (January 24, 1936, murder). Three hundred and sixty-two people were executed between 1910 and 1961. The chair from the gas chamber is now part of the collection at the North Carolina Museum of History.

The Modern Era

No one was executed in North Carolina between 1961 and 1984. When executions resumed, inmates were allowed to choose the manner of death – gas or lethal injection. Of the ten people executed between 1984 and 1998, all but two chose lethal injection. Ricky Lee Sanderson of Iredell County was the last person to die in the gas chamber, asphyxiated on January 30, 1998 for murder.

LI gurneyForty-three people have been executed in North Carolina in the modern era. The first, James W. Hutchins of McDowell County, died by lethal injection on March 16, 1984. On August 18, 2006, Sammy Flippen of Forsyth County became the last person to die in North Carolina’s death chamber.

The only method of execution in North Carolina at the present time is lethal injection. In early 2007, executions were halted due to concerns about the constitutionality of the procedure. The State is working to resume executions as soon as possible. (image source)


Death Penalty Resources (Video)

July 6, 2007

As it’s an unusually slow news day, here are links to films and videos about the death penalty:

* DPIC‘s collection of audio and video clips from TV, documentaries, and other sources
* Alieen Wournos: The Selling of a Serial Killer
* Dead Man Walking
* Deadline
* A Death in the Family
* The Exonerated
* The Farm: Life Inside Angola Prison
* The Green Mile
* Love Lived on Death Row
* Monster’s Ball
* Redemption: The Stan Tookie Williams Story
* The Thin Blue Line


Proportionality

March 21, 2007

Common sense isn’t sexy. It’s hard to get all worked up over something that seems perfectly reasonable. Maybe that’s why so little attention has been paid to House Bill 341. That, and explaining the death penalty appeals process in a soundbite is about as easy as carrying a rhinocerous in your purse.

For right now, let’s just focus on the direct appeal. After a defendant has been convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to death, his or her case is automatically appealed to the North Carolina Supreme Court. The purpose of this review is to ensure that the death penalty is administered consistently from case to case. Nothing wrong with that, right? Whether or not you believe that the death penalty is influenced by arbitrary factors like race and geography, you probably don’t want capital punishment to depend on passion, prejudice, and chance. Hence proportionality review.

Moving on to the ‘sense to come in out of the rain’ portion of our lesson. At present, the relevant statute directs the Supreme Court to compare the result in a given case to “the penalty imposed in similar cases, considering both the crime and the defendant” to ensure that the death sentence is not “excessive or disproportionate.” N.C. Gen. Stat. 15A-2000(d)(2). What that statute says to me is, “If you’ve got a case involving a guy with a prior robbery conviction who shoots a convenience store clerk during a stick-up at 2 AM, you should check to see if there are any other murder cases involving a guy with a prior robbery conviction who shoots a convenience store clerk during a stick-up at 2 AM.” Call me crazy.

Call the North Carolina Supreme Court…something else. The Court has interpreted “similar cases” to mean “cases in which the same sentence was imposed,” thereby ignoring the 97% of homicide cases in which the defendant is not sentenced to death. Consideration of similar crimes and similar defendants is only secondary, and the Court often cobbles together its justification piecemeal. Rather than looking at the ten cases with identical facts which resulted in life sentences, the Court will reach back in time to find a death case – any death case – involving a prior felony OR a convenience store OR a killing in the middle of the night. Similar enough.

In applying such blinders, the Court has virtually ensured that no death case will be found excessive or disproportionate. When you’re a hammer, everything looks like a nail. The Supreme Court has failed to meet its obligation to consider each case individually. It’s as if they cut and paste reasoning from past decisions without any further thought; the Court continues to cite cases that have long been overruled. In the last twenty-four years, over two hundred death-sentenced defendants have come before the Supreme Court for proportionality review. Relief has been granted in only eight cases, and every death sentence has been upheld since 2002.

The Court has utterly failed to protect against excessive and disproportionate sentences. Even supporters of the death penalty, like former North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Burley B. Mitchell, Jr., recognize that being sentenced to death in North Carolina is, “like being picked in a lottery…it’s totally arbitrary.”

Representatives Earle (D-Mecklenburg), Glazier (D-Cumberland), Parmon (D-Forsyth), and Wainwright (D-Craven and Lenoir) are the primary sponsors of House Bill 341, which would return common sense and judicial responsibility to direct appeals in North Carolina. The bill makes explicit the Supreme Court’s obligation to consider the full range of first-degree murder cases:

In determining whether a sentence of death imposed under this section is disproportionate, the Supreme Court shall consider and compare factually similar cases that have been reviewed on appeal by the Supreme Court or the Court of Appeals. The reported cases compared by the Supreme Court shall include both those in which the jury recommended life imprisonment, with or without parole, and those in which the jury recommended the death penalty.

Nothing outrageous about that. Contact your representative and let them know that when someone’s life is at stake, the Supreme Court owes them – and all of us – more than just a rubber stamp.


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